Brace For Big Earthquakes As The Sun Fires Up Again

A man pointing to Portugal on a map of the Earth.

Track the earthquakes over the next few weeks as the Sun fires up some CMEs.

When the Sun fires off huge coronal mass ejections (CMEs), earthquake records show that an increase in earthquakes occur at the same time all over the world.

This connection between solar storms and earthquakes may result in some doozies over the next few weeks because the Sun is firing up again.

Big Sunspots

Most CMEs reach the Earth in one to three days after they have ejected from the Sun’s surface. A powerful CME pointed toward Earth moving over 600 miles per second can disturb the upper atmosphere enough to disrupt radio signals and affect electronic systems in satellites both in space and on the ground.

A picture of a solar flare, or CME, exploding off the surface of the Sun.

NOAA forecasters estimate a 50% chance of M-class flares, and a 20% chance of X-flares on November 10th.

Between November 5-8, 2013, a big sunspot (tagged AR1890) erupted off the surface of the Sun and produced an intense X3-class solar flare. AR1890 has calmed down a bit, but scientists believe this could be the calm before the storm.

The expanding Jupiter-sized sunspot has a “beta-gamma-delta” magnetic field that harbors energy for future strong flares. NOAA forecasters estimate a 50% chance of M-class flares, and a 20% chance of X-flares on November 10th.

Big Quakes

No one can predict when large earthquakes will occur – or where – but keep an eye on the Sun (not literally), and monitor the M-class and X-flares this month. And keep your feet firmly on the ground.

 

Can Solar Storms Warn Us Of Earthquakes Coming?

A NASA picture of the Sun.

Solar flares appear to influence large earthquakes – Photo from NASA

When the Sun fires off huge coronal mass ejections (CMEs), earthquake records show that there is an increase in earthquakes at the same time all over the world.

When the Sun is calm and is not throwing out as many massive CMEs, the “number” of earthquakes worldwide goes down.

We can use this knowledge of possibilities to predict (as much as humanly possible) large earthquakes, especially near major metropolitan areas and around nuclear power plants.

Big Flares and Large Quakes

The sun has erupted more than a dozen times over the past week, throwing radiation into space; some CMEs are heading toward Earth, and some outward into the unknown. According to NASA, the Sun fired off 24 medium strength M-class flares and 4 stronger X-class flares between October 23 – 30.

A picture of a solar flare, or CME, exploding off the surface of the Sun.

Big flares appear when big quakes shake the Earth.

The following large earthquakes occurred on Earth at this time:

  1. 6.6  43km SSW of Coquimbo, Chile  2013-10-31
  2. 6.3  45km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan  2013-10-31
  3. 6.2  46km W of Constitucion, Chile  2013-10-30
  4. 7.1  Off the east coast of Honshu, Japan  2013-10-25
  5. 6.7  East of the South Sandwich Islands  2013-10-24
  6. 6.5  91km SW of Etchoropo, Mexico  2013-10-19
  7. 6.8  64km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea  2013-10-16
  8. 7.1  5km SE of Sagbayan, Philippines  2013-10-15
  9. 6.4  30km W of Platanos, Greece  2013-10-12
  10. 6.1  33km N of Gueiria, Venezuela  2013-10-12
  11. 4.9  53km WNW of Eureka, California  2013-10-11
A picture of Hong Kong, Japan, a major city built within a natural disaster zone.

Humans build major populated cities on top of active earthquake zones – beautiful but dangerous.

The Solar/Quake Cycle

Today, this very minute, the solar cycle is reaching its peak, so this means that the Sun is “sucking up” more energy from its surface because its magnetic poles are preparing to flip. Scientists are monitoring this polar magnetic flip, and this should provide some hints when the next CMEs will flare up.

This should also provide us with some hints when the next large earthquakes will respond, here on the Earth.

THIS should provide the massive concentrations of people living along the most volatile earthquake zones some sort of warning when to expect larger earthquakes.

The question to ask is are we paying attention?

CMEs

Someone texting on their cell phone.

If your cell phone is acting up, it’s probably caused by the most recent CME.

Solar flares are strong bursts of radiation that sling powerful material through space toward Earth (known as a CME or coronal mass ejection), and some can be quite harmful. Most CMEs reach the Earth in one to three days after they have ejected from the Sun’s surface.

A powerful CME pointed toward Earth moving over 600 miles per second can disturb the upper atmosphere enough to disrupt radio signals and affect electronic systems in satellites both in space and on the ground.

Apparently the Earth’s earthquake zones DO respond to the Sun’s X-class flares, wouldn’t you say?

 

10 Hot Facts About The Sun

A picture of the sun.

Our magnificent Sun.

Every morning people all over the world watch the Sun rise. Most of us don’t think much about it because … well, it’s just the Sun.

The neat thing about our Sun is that it is here every day. Thank goodness for that because without our Sun, there would be no life on Earth. Our planet is positioned exactly the right distance from the Sun to support life; not too close and not too far away.

10 Hot Facts About The Sun

A NASA picture of the Sun.

The Sun is the perfect distance from the Earth to support all life on our planet. – Photo from NASA

Here are 10 really neat facts about the Sun:

  1. If the Sun was the size of a beach ball, then the Earth would be the size of a pea.
  2. Light takes approximately 8 minutes to travel from the Sun to the Earth.
  3. The Sun rotates on its own axis, which takes approximately 25 days.
  4. It takes 240 million years for the Sun to completely orbit around the center of the Milky Way galaxy; the Sun’s where it was about the time the dinosaurs appeared.
  5. The diameter of the Sun equals the diameter of 109 Earths.
  6. If the Sun stopped producing heat and energy today, it would take 50 million years before it devastated the Earth.
  7. The Sun is only one star among 200 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.
  8. Five million tons of material is lost on the Sun every second.
  9. The Earth receives 94 billion megawatts of energy from the Sun every day.
  10. The Sun’s temperature at its core is 14 million Kelvin (25 million degrees Fahrenheit).
A picture of the hot sun.

What an awesome star just 93 million miles from us.