Forecasting The What If?

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No one wants think about natural disasters destroying life as we know it. Life on Earth is awesome – our planet is filled with so much beauty, magnificence, and miracles.

Most of us choose to think about natural disasters later. The majority of us believe that major Earth events won’t happen in our lifetime, but too few have considered what our children or grandchildren may go through.

Forecasting The End

Here is the link to The Weather Channel’s short clips from their evening series, Forecasting The Future. This is an excellent Cliff’s Note education about what can happen to our planet.

Tips To Shift With Major Events

You can begin NOW making the much needed changes that can save you, your family, and your future loved ones from fear and discomfort.

  1. Get involved with local politics and secure that your community leaders are on their game concerning environmental and future development;
  2. Good local government bleeds into better state governments, which moves up the ladder into federal government;
  3. Spend your money supporting local farmers, shops and venders;
  4. Install alternative energy in your schools, homes, and businesses, and get off the global oil and gas grid;
  5. Bank with credit unions, local and small banks;
  6. Keep cash and small change on hand;
  7. Relocate from coastal areas, and encourage local governments to stop developing along rising shorelines;
  8. Keep stored water and dry foods/dry goods for two weeks of an emergency supply per household for both you and your pets.

Earth changes are nothing to be scared of – they are something to understand better so you can be more prepared.

Prepare for the inevitable, now and for the future, and go back to enjoying a wonderful life on this magnificent planet.

 

The Earth in space

Our Earth is a magnificent planet – enjoy it.

 

Floods, Fires and 5.0 Quakes Today

There is a lot going on around the Earth today, August 10, 2013. There are floods, fires, and 5.0 earthquakes all over the world.

A picture of a bus and a car with flood waters halfway up their vehicles.

There are floods all over the world.

Floods

  1. West Africa
  2. Southwest Nicaragua
  3. Sudan
  4. Katsina, Nigeria
  5. Northern Region, Uganda
  6. Eastern China
  7. Marigot, Kenya
  8. Victoria, Australia
  9. Eastern Malaysia
  10. Central USA
  11. Amur Region, Russia
  12. Colorado, USA
A picture of a firefighter.

WIldfires are breaking out worldwide.

Wildfires

  1. Montenegro
  2. Slovenia
  3. Bosnia and Herzegovina
  4. Washington State, USA
  5. Montana, USA
  6. Idaho, USA
  7. California, USA

5.0 Earthquakes

  1. Iran
  2. Alaska
  3. Papua New Guinea
  4. Greece
  5. Indonesia
  6. Japan
  7. Tonga
A picutre of a beautiful meteor and the moon in the background.

The Perseids meteor shower on August 10, 2013.

And the Perseids Meteor shower is tonight. Go figure ….

Another Wildfire Spreading In Southern California

A picture of a firefighter.

Another dangerous wildfire in California. Courtesy of FireRescue.com

Over 1,600 firefighters, seven retardant tankers, and a dozen helicopters are attempting to control a wildfire burning 90 miles east of Los Angeles in the San Jacinto Mountains.

The fire started on Wednesday, August 7, 2013, and spread from 2,000 acres to 25 square miles overnight. It has already destroyed over 26 homes, and if it continues to burn at its current rate, it could impact more than 500 more residences, forcing more than 1,800 people to evacuate the area.

Evacuation orders covered the rural communities of Cabazon, Poppet Flats, Twin Pines, Edna Valley, Vista Grande, and several camping and hiking areas.

Second Time Around

A picture of a California wildfire burning close to wind towers in the San Jacinto Mountains.

California wildfire burning close to wind towers in the San Jacinto Mountains. Courtesy of California Fire News

This is the second major wildfire in the San Jacinto Mountains this summer. A blaze that erupted in mid-July spread over 43 square miles on peaks above Palm Springs, burning seven homes and forcing 6,000 people out of Idyllwild and neighboring towns to evacuate.

This fire, however, is burning in the footprint of the 2006 Esperanza Fire.

California Fires

Most of Southern California’s severe wildfires are caused by Santa Ana winds that spin a clockwise flow of air into the region.

This week’s fire, however, was caused by a counter-clockwise flow over northwest California. The National Weather Service expects that conditions could change next week, but hopefully, the fire will be well contained by then.